Canvassing Opinion

Canvases are all the same, right? Sort of. So why would it appear that art shops sell canvases at a much higher price than say, a home furnishing or bargain book shop? Are they ripping off their customers?

On first glance, all canvases appear to look the same, and they all carry the name ‘canvas’, but there is much more to this humble, ancient painting surface than meets the eye. There are many things that will cause canvases to be more expensive:

i) The weight, the weave, or the type of canvas will make a difference. For example a 7.5oz canvas has a more open weave than a 10oz canvas. Callico, Cotton, or Linen canvases will also change the price (and the look).

ii) Is the canvas primed? If it is primed well you should be able to hold it up to the light and not see any daylight shining through (which is often the case with cheaper canvases).

iii) How the canvas is secured to the frame. Often with more budget canvases, there are visible nails or staples on the sides. With better quality canvases these move to the back, and with good quality canvases they are hidden altogether in grooves.

iv) The wooden support. This is perhaps the most important thing to consider when buying a canvas, and yet is often over looked. It is the wood that will make or break (quite literally) the canvas.

It is this that can mean the difference between a cheap canvas and an expensive one. If the wood is not well seasoned then should the canvas be hanging on a wall above a radiator, the heat may cause the canvas to twist put of shape and bend. An awful and embarrassing mistake to make especially if it was for a commissioned or exhibition piece of work. Good quality canvases will use better quality wood which will keep its shape no matter where the picture will be hanging. So although canvases are all called canvases, there are many reasons why some appear to be cheaper than others.

Generally art shops will sell mid range to high end canvases as their customer base dictates quality and longevity over price, whereas bargain shops who have the reputation for stocking inexpensive items will very rarely sell good quality items at pocket money prices.